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Liver: Surface Features – Liver and Gallbladder

by James Pickering, PhD
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    00:01 let’s have a look at the surface features of the liver which we can see.

    00:04 This little man here is indicating the gross position of the liver.

    00:09 But we can see that this is going to be down the right side. So we have this nice large right lobe of the liver. We have this much smaller left lobe.

    00:19 So on this anterior view of the liver, we can see the diaphragm up here and we can see the right and left lobes. We can see that these right and left lobes are separated via the falciform ligament.

    00:35 Separated by the falciform ligaments and this is a really important ligament as it connects the liver to the anterior abdominal wall.

    00:46 So if we remember the peritoneuml that is attached to the anterior surface of the liver, this visceral peritoneum, that's going to be running all the way across the liver in this direction. As it running all the way across the liver we can see it here and we can see it here. And then when these two parts of the peritoneum come together, they unite and then extend to the anterior abdominal wall. So here they're just uniting and then extending towards the anterior abdominal wall and that forms your falciform ligament.

    01:20 We can see the same happening up here with the coronary ligaments projecting to the diaphragm. This helps to support the liver in this position.

    01:30 If we look, if we imagine the anterior abdominal wall is here and this is the liver which we can see here. And then spanning the anterior abdominal wall towards the liver we have the falciform ligament. Then here where the falciform ligament finishes we have what's known as the free edge. So this is your liver, this is your anterior abdominal wall.

    01:52 and this is the falciform ligament. And we can see the spanning is the falciform ligament and its free edge is a structure known as the round ligament of the liver.

    02:03 And this is really important; because, this ligaments used to be a patent blood vessel, they used to be a umbilical vein that allow the blood to pass into the developing fetus from the mother's placenta.

    02:19 And blood pass through this free edge of the falciform ligament within the round ligament of the liver now within the umbilical vein. It will then run up to posterior surface of the liver which you will see in the moment.

    02:35 So here we can see the posterior surface of the liver. We can now see again and we have this right lobe, that's over here. And we have this left lobe which is here.

    02:45 But we can know see for the first time, left robe.

    02:50 larger right lobe. We have these two other lobes positioned here and here.

    02:54 One positioned next to the inferior vena cava and other positioned next to gallbladder.

    03:00 So we can see, that this one next that's positioned next to the inferior vena cava this lobe here is known as the caudate lobe. This is the caudate lobe this is the third of those anatomical lobes. We then have the lobe that's positioned next to the gallbladder and that is the quadrate lobe.

    03:19 And we can see the quadrate lobe is here. So we got these right and left lobes and between them we have the caudate and quadrate lobes.

    03:29 There is a fissure between the left and the caudate and the quadrate lobes. So this fissure running down here is an important fissure as it contains the round ligament of the liver. It contains that round ligament of the liver.

    03:46 Which is now going to run up in this direction. And it becomes as it running on this posterior surface of the liver, the ligamentum venosum it just changes its name. And ultimately this would be taking blood, oxygenated blood from the placenta, it bypass the liver and this will go directly into the inferior vena cava.

    04:12 As we no longer have the placenta attached since we were born.

    04:16 This patent blood vessel this umbilical vein becomes fibrosed.

    04:22 And then we will left with the ligamentum venosum. That's running in this fissure between the left lobe and the caudate and the quadrate lobe.

    04:31 Between the right lobe, so this lobe over here, and the quadrate lobe we find the inferior vena cava, we find the inferior vena cava and between the right lobe and the quadrate lobe we find we have the gallbladder.

    04:48 The gallbladder is storing bile.

    04:50 Between the caudate and the quadrate lobe we have this region here And this region is known as the porta hepatis. If you remember the portal triad the portal triad running in the free edge of the lesser omentum in the hepatoduodenal ligament, it contain three structures.

    05:09 And those three structures are now passing towards this opening of the liver. It's kind of gateway to the liver that allowed these vessels to pass in and out. So at the porta hepatis we found the same three structures that were in the portal triad. We find the hepatic portal vein which we can see here.

    05:30 We can see the hepatic artery which we can see here. And we can also see the bile duct which we can see running out here. These three structures passing or leaving to and from the liver, ultimately then run in the portal triad.

    05:47 Remember the free edge of the lesser omentum. And that's how these structures can pass into the liver or away from it.


    About the Lecture

    The lecture Liver: Surface Features – Liver and Gallbladder by James Pickering, PhD is from the course Abdomen.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Umbilical vein
    2. Umbilical artery
    3. Hepatic vein
    4. Hepatic portal vein
    1. Right and quadrate.
    2. Left and quadrate.
    3. Caudate and quadrate.
    4. Left and right lobe.
    1. Caudate and quadrate lobe.
    2. Left and right lobes.
    3. Left lobe and caudate lobe.
    4. Right lobe and caudate lobe.
    5. Left lobe and the quadrate lobe.
    1. Hepatoduodenal ligament.
    2. Falciform ligament.
    3. Round ligament.
    4. Coronary ligament.
    5. Hepatogastric ligament.

    Author of lecture Liver: Surface Features – Liver and Gallbladder

     James Pickering, PhD

    James Pickering, PhD


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