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Urinalysis: Urine Sediment

by Carlo Raj, MD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Urinalysis: Urine Sediment by Carlo Raj, MD is from the course Urinalysis. It contains the following chapters:

    • Chemical Dipsticks - Blood & Nitrates
    • Cells in Urine Sediment
    • Casts in Urine Sediment
    • Crystals in Urine Sediment
    • Various Morphology on Urinalysis

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Muscle breakdown
    2. Dehydration
    3. Nephritic syndrome
    4. Nephrotic syndrome
    5. Urinary tract infection
    1. Intravascular hemolytic anemia
    2. Extravascular hemolytic anemia
    3. Glomerular damage
    4. Urethritis
    5. Renal stones
    1. E. Coli
    2. P. mirabilis
    3. S. saprophyticus
    4. Klebsiella spp.
    5. C. trachomatis
    1. C. trachomatis
    2. E. Coli
    3. S. aureus
    4. S. saprophyticus
    5. P. mirabilis
    1. Neutrophils are present in the urinary tract.
    2. Nitrate-reducing uropathogen in the urinary tract.
    3. Tuberculosis urinary tract infection.
    4. Drug-induced interstitial nephritis.
    5. C. trachomatis infection.
    1. 2-3 RBCs per high powered field
    2. > 5 RBCs per high powered field in a uncentrifuged specimen
    3. None of these are correct
    4. At least 1 RBC per high powered field
    5. > 10 RBCs per high powered field in a centrifuged specimen
    1. IgA nephropathy
    2. Diabetic nephropathy
    3. Minimal change disease
    4. Cirrhosis
    5. Kwashiorkor
    1. More than 2-3 RBCs per HPF indicates nephrotic syndrome.
    2. Dysmorphic red blood cells imply a glomerular origin of hematuria.
    3. Oval fat bodies are renal tubular cells filled with lipid.
    4. More than 5 WBCs per HPF in an uncentrifuged specimen is considered pyuria.
    5. More than 10 WBCs per HPF in a centrifuged specimen is considered pyuria.
    1. Pathology is of renal origin.
    2. Patient is dehydrated.
    3. Patient will have high cholesterol levels.
    4. It must be a nephrotic syndrome.
    5. Patient has a urinary tract infection.
    1. Eosinophils
    2. Neutrophils
    3. Tamm-Horsfall protein
    4. Hyaline
    5. Red blood cell
    1. If there is also proteinuria.
    2. If there is also glucosuria.
    3. If they are dehydrated.
    4. If it occurs after a heavy workout.
    5. If it occurs in the morning.
    1. Waxy, broad cast
    2. Fatty cast
    3. RBC cast
    4. Hyaline cast
    5. Renal tubular cast
    1. Tamm-Horsfall proteins
    2. Lipid
    3. Neutrophils
    4. Hyaline
    5. Red blood cells
    1. Pure vegan diet
    2. Ethylene glycol poisoning
    3. Sterile pyuria
    4. Proteus urinary tract infection
    5. Hypercalcemia
    1. Uric acid crystals
    2. Hexagonal crystals
    3. Cystine crystals
    4. Calcium oxalate crystals
    5. Triple phosphate crystals
    1. Ornithine
    2. Tryptophan
    3. Phenylalanine
    4. Leucine
    5. Valine
    1. Acute tubular necrosis
    2. Nephrotic syndrome
    3. Dehydration
    4. Nephritic syndrome
    5. Chronic renal failure
    1. It is often due to a reversible etiology.
    2. It has a refractile quality with distinct margins.
    3. It is often a product of renal ischemia.
    4. Casts show degenerating renal tubular cells.
    5. Diameter of the cast is increased due to tubular atrophy.
    1. Oval fat bodies
    2. Calcium oxalate crystals
    3. Fatty cast
    4. Cystine crystals
    5. Hyaline casts
    1. Urethritis
    2. Pyelonephritis
    3. Nephrotic syndrome
    4. Acute interstitial nephritis
    5. Acute tubular necrosis

    Author of lecture Urinalysis: Urine Sediment

     Carlo Raj, MD

    Carlo Raj, MD


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