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Urinalysis: Urine Dipstick

by Carlo Raj, MD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Urinalysis: Urine Dipstick by Carlo Raj, MD is from the course Urinalysis. It contains the following chapters:

    • Analysis of Urine
    • Chemical Dipsticks - pH & Protein
    • Chemical Dipsticks - Glucose & Ketones
    • Chemical Dipsticks - Bilirubin & Urobilirubin
    • Diseases and Steps in Metabolism

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Hypertonic loss of sodium
    2. Water deprivation
    3. Increased urobilinogen
    4. Vitamin B ingestion
    5. Excessive sweating
    1. It is associated with respiratory acidosis.
    2. On exposure to oxygen, urine turns black.
    3. It presents with an elevated level of homogentisic acid in the urine.
    4. It is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern.
    5. It is a deficiency of the enzyme, homogentisic oxidase
    1. Acidity of urine pH converts hemoglobin to hematin.
    2. Presence of homogentisic acid in the urine.
    3. Intravascular destruction of red blood cells.
    4. Bacterial metabolism of bicarbonate.
    5. Excessive protein concentration in the urine.
    1. It is caused by inappropriate complement activation.
    2. It is a form of extravascular hemolysis.
    3. It may be managed by increased vitamin consumption.
    4. It presents with smoky colored urine.
    5. It is the result of nocturnal respiratory alkalosis.
    1. Hypotonic loss of sodium
    2. Nephrotic syndrome
    3. Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria
    4. Crush injury
    5. Acute intermittent porphyria
    1. Phosphates
    2. White blood cells
    3. Myoglobin
    4. Bacteria
    5. Uric acid
    1. 1.008
    2. None of the answers are correct
    3. 1.020
    4. 1.018
    5. 1.023
    1. Renal concentrating ability is defective
    2. Urine osmolality is > 900 mOsm/kg
    3. Plasma osmolality is low.
    4. ADH concentrations are high
    5. Extrinsic renal disease is excluded
    1. Urinary tract infection with Proteus mirabilis
    2. Urinary tract infection with Escherichia coli
    3. Diabetes mellitus
    4. Diet high in meat
    5. Strict vegan diet
    1. Microalbuminuria
    2. Glucosuria
    3. Renal papillary necrosis
    4. Dehydration
    5. Elevated serum glucose
    1. In order to detect globulins.
    2. In order to detect albumin.
    3. In order to detect protein content.
    4. In order to detect glucose.
    5. In order to detect fructose.
    1. 30 mg/dL
    2. 50 mg/dL
    3. 200 mg/dL
    4. 150 mg/dL
    5. 100 mg/dL
    1. Renal threshold for glucose is lowered.
    2. It is always pathologic.
    3. Glucosuria is not common in pregnant patients.
    4. Renal threshold for glucose is higher.
    5. None of these are correct.
    1. Essential fructosuria
    2. Pregnancy
    3. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria
    4. Acute intermittent porphyria
    5. Diabetes mellitus type 1
    1. Beta hydroxybutyric acid
    2. Acetone
    3. All of the answers are detected.
    4. Two of the answers are not detected.
    5. Acetoacetate
    1. Microalbuminuria dipstick
    2. Nitroprusside dipstick
    3. pH dipstick
    4. SSA dipstick
    5. Glucose dipstick
    1. It is always pathological if detected in the urine.
    2. It must be chaperoned by albumin in the blood.
    3. It is NOT detected using the bilirubin dipstick.
    4. It is responsible for the presentation of jaundice/icterus.
    5. It is lipid soluble.
    1. Urine conjugated bilirubin
    2. Urine urobilinogen
    3. Intravascular hemolysis
    4. Extravascular hemolysis
    5. Urine unconjugated bilirubin
    1. Urine bilirubin
    2. Urine urobilinogen
    3. All are expected to be present.
    4. Fecal stercobilin
    5. Urine urobilin
    1. Urobilin
    2. Stercobilin
    3. Conjugated bilirubin
    4. Unconjugated bilirubin
    5. Urobilinogen
    1. It must have been processed in the intestine.
    2. Urobilin is always pathological.
    3. It is produced directly from unconjugated bilirubin
    4. It is released into the blood only if there is obstruction.
    5. Urobilin is responsible for the brown colour of feces.
    1. It is found in the urine in certain pathological states.
    2. It is lipid soluble.
    3. It is released from splenic macrophages.
    4. It is responsible for the presentation of jaundice/icterus.
    5. It must be chaperoned by albumin in the blood.
    1. Intestine
    2. Liver
    3. Kidney
    4. Macrophages
    5. Spleen

    Author of lecture Urinalysis: Urine Dipstick

     Carlo Raj, MD

    Carlo Raj, MD


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