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Microcytic Anemia: Iron Deficiency Anemia – Red Blood Cell Pathology

by Carlo Raj, MD
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    Our first category of anemias, we’ll be looking at microcytic anemias. And under microcytic, it will be iron deficiency. Think about where you are. Your MCV is? Good. Less than 80. Let’s begin with the fundamentals, shall we? We’ll take a look at hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is made up of alpha and beta. That is something that you must know. Later on at some point, when we talk a microcytic anemia known as thalassemias, then we’ll be dealing with those alphas and betas, but in addition, we’ll also take a look at your deltas and gammas, won’t we? And with hemoglobin, here, under iron deficiency and a couple of others, we’ll be paying attention to the heme, the heme, the heme. And so because heme is so tightly bound or really associated with iron. You must be familiar with your iron studies for labs and you will only be using that for the most part under microcytic, and understand what it means when your iron studies come back to be normal. First, with our microcytic anemias, we’ll take a look at the heme in which it has now become – For whatever reason, the porphyria pathway has then become compromised. Well, here, at first, it’s literally the fact that the individual is iron-deficient. So if the patient’s iron deficient, this hemoglobin that we’re seeing here, this molecule, made up of – What kind of hemoglobin would this be if it’s alpha and beta, what do you mean? Is it hemoglobin A? A2? Is it F? Is it S? Is It C? Which one is it? Good. It’s the A, right? So normal alphas and betas is hemoglobin A. You know that. You should know that. If you don’t, know it now. Because we have to talk about the different hemoglobins. You’ve...

    About the Lecture

    The lecture Microcytic Anemia: Iron Deficiency Anemia – Red Blood Cell Pathology by Carlo Raj, MD is from the course Microcytic Anemia – Red Blood Cell Pathology (RBC). It contains the following chapters:

    • Microcytic Anemias
    • Iron Deficiency Anemia - Etiology
    • Iron Deficiency Anemia - Signs and Symptoms
    • Iron Deficiency Anemia - Iron Studies

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Alpha-thalassemia
    2. Iron deficiency anemia
    3. None of these
    4. Sideroblastic anemia
    5. Anemia of chronic disease
    1. It is an iron overload state.
    2. It is an iron deficient state.
    3. It is due to defective beta chain synthesis.
    4. It is due to defective alpha chain synthesis.
    5. Heme synthesis is intact in it.
    1. Oligomenorrhea
    2. Menorrhagia
    3. Angiodysplasia
    4. Colon cancer
    5. Chronic NSAIDs use
    1. Normocytic and microcytic anemia
    2. Hemolytic and megaloblastic anemia
    3. Normocytic and macrocytic anemia
    4. Hemolytic and aplastic anemia
    5. Iron deficiency and cobalamine deficiency anemia
    1. Vitamin C
    2. Vitamin D
    3. Vitamin K
    4. Vitamin B6
    5. Vitamin B12
    1. A patient with lead poisoning
    2. A newborn breastfed baby
    3. A patient with decreased gastric acid secretion
    4. A patient with pernicious anemia
    5. An elderly malnourished individual
    1. Difficulty swallowing liquids
    2. Difficulty swallowing solids
    3. Iron deficiency
    4. Glossitis
    5. Esophageal web
    1. Koilonychia
    2. Clubbing
    3. Paronychia
    4. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy
    5. Pica
    1. Decreased ferritin, decreased serum iron, and increased TIBC
    2. Normal ferritin, decreased serum iron, and decreased TIBC
    3. Decreased ferritin, decreased serum iron, and decreased TIBC
    4. Decreased ferritin, increased serum iron, and increased TIBC
    5. Increased ferritin, decreased serum iron, and increased TIBC
    1. Decreased mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC)
    2. Increased mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC)
    3. Increased red cell distribution width (RDW)
    4. Increased mean corpuscular volume (MCV)
    5. Decreased mean corpuscular volume (MCV)
    1. Heme
    2. None of these
    3. Alpha globin chains
    4. Beta globin chains
    5. Protoporphyrin

    Author of lecture Microcytic Anemia: Iron Deficiency Anemia – Red Blood Cell Pathology

     Carlo Raj, MD

    Carlo Raj, MD


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    Its short and simple Highly valuable for a pre bookreading understanding and overview
    By Uzema Sahiba M. on 29. December 2016 for Microcytic Anemia: Iron Deficiency Anemia – Red Blood Cell Pathology

    Its short and simple Highly valuable for a pre bookreading understanding and overview