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Innervation – Abdominal Walls and Inguinal Canal

by Craig Canby, PhD
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    00:00 other contributing blood vessels that would help supply the abdominal wall.

    00:01 Innervation to the anterolateral abdominal wall as mentioned earlier is provided by anterior rami at T7 down through T12 as well as L1 for muscular distribution. In addition of these anterior rami, also will have a dermatomal pattern of distribution. And this just gives you a general idea for those anterior rami running or travelling within the abdominal wall. Here is the level T7. It is going to relate to the level of the xiphoid process.

    00:38 T10 is emerging in through here and will relate more medially to the umbilical area. And your most inferior dermatomal contribution, L1, that is seen down below here, that is going to run along the inguinal region.

    01:02 Innervation to the muscles of the posterior abdominal wall are going to be from anterior rami of your spinal nerves as follows. You would have T12 and L1 through L4. The quadratus lumborum shown in through here is innervated by all of those segmental levels. The psoas major which is seen on the opposite side would be innervated by L1 through L3 levels. The psoas minor, which we see here, the muscle belly is very thin, we see the tendon of the psoas minor. It will be innervated by L1. The iliacus, which we see over in through here, is innervated by the femoral nerve. The femoral nerve, and its entirety, is formed from contributions of L2, L3 and L4.

    02:04 We can also visualize and highlight some of these rami. Here at this level, we are at the 12th rib and we see a nerve penetrating the substance of the quadratus lumborum, it would help innervate it, but also have that anterolateral distribution that we saw on the previous slide. This is the T12 anterior ramus also known as the subcostal nerve.

    02:29 Here, we have the L1 anterior ramus and at this level, it is split into an ileal epigastric nerve above and an inguinal nerve below. L2 is here, L3 is coming out of this level and then L4 is emerging at this particular point in the illustration.

    02:55 Next, we will take a moment to understand the inguinal canal and the features that you


    About the Lecture

    The lecture Innervation – Abdominal Walls and Inguinal Canal by Craig Canby, PhD is from the course Abdominal Wall.


    Included Quiz Questions

    1. T10
    2. T8
    3. T9
    4. T11
    5. T12
    1. T 7.
    2. T 8.
    3. T 9.
    4. T 10.
    5. T 11.

    Author of lecture Innervation – Abdominal Walls and Inguinal Canal

     Craig Canby, PhD

    Craig Canby, PhD


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