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Cutaneous Innervation and Venous Drainage of Lower Limb

by James Pickering, PhD
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    In this lecture, we?re going to look at the superficial structures and cutaneous innervation of the lower limb. So we?re going to look at the fascia of the lower limb, both the superficial and deep quite briefly, but we?ll look specifically at the fascia lata. We?ll then look at the venous drainage by way of the great and short saphenous veins. And then we?ll look at the cutaneous innervation, the dermatomal distribution, and some important cutaneous nerves. Similar to the upper limb, we have a tight layer of deep fascia that is running all over the lower limb. Here, we see the anterior surface of the lower limb, and here we see the posterior surface and you see we have this glistening white membrane, which is the deep fascia. Superficial to the deep fascia, we have the superficial fascia, which is in the subcutaneous tissue just deep to the skin. This, like the superficial fascia of the upper limb, is made up of loose connective tissue and can contain fats. The superficial fascia of the lower limb, again just like of the upper limb, is pierced by those cutaneous nerves and superficial veins. Anterior to the knee joints, the loose fascia is tightly adhered to the deep fascia of the lateral and anterior aspects, and that enables effective contraction of the knee joint and it prevents any fascia from being trapped due to flexion of the knee. Between the superficial fascia and skeletal muscles, we have the deep fascia. And again, that is similar to the fascia of the upper limb. This is made up of dense, well-organized connective tissue, and there is no fat. So here we have the deep fascia of the lower limb. Specifically, we?re going to talk about the fascia lata. The deep fascia is very...

    About the Lecture

    The lecture Cutaneous Innervation and Venous Drainage of Lower Limb by James Pickering, PhD is from the course Lower Limb Anatomy. It contains the following chapters:

    • Superficial structures and cutaneous innervation
    • Fascia
    • Venous drainage
    • Cutaneous innervation

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. is accompanied by the saphenous nerve in the lower leg
    2. passes anterior to the lateral malleolus
    3. enters the femoral vein in the middle of the thigh
    4. is also known as the short saphenous vein
    1. Great saphenous vein
    2. External iliac vein
    3. Internal iliac vein
    4. Short saphenous vein

    Author of lecture Cutaneous Innervation and Venous Drainage of Lower Limb

     James Pickering, PhD

    James Pickering, PhD


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