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Pulmonary Pathology: Introduction, Bronchial Anatomy & Dyspnea

by Carlo Raj, MD
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    About the Lecture

    The lecture Pulmonary Pathology: Introduction, Bronchial Anatomy & Dyspnea by Carlo Raj, MD is from the course Introduction to Pulmonary Pathology. It contains the following chapters:

    • Pulmonary Pathology: Clinical Anatomy
    • Clinical Anatomy: Upper Portion
    • Clinical Anatomy: Middle Portion
    • Clinical Anatomy: Respiratory Zone
    • Dyspnea: Definition
    • Dyspnea: Causes
    • Dyspnea: History

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. 760mmHg
    2. 250mmHg
    3. 700mmHg
    4. 540mmHg
    5. 820mmHg
    1. Ciliated columnar cells
    2. Non-keratinized squamous cells
    3. Cuboidal cells
    4. Pseudostratified cuboidal cells
    5. Ciliated pseudostratified squamous cells
    1. Alveoli
    2. Trachea
    3. Bronchi
    4. Bronchioles containing goblet cells
    5. Cartilaginous bronchi
    1. Columnar cells to squamous cells
    2. Ciliated columnar cells to non-ciliated columnar cells
    3. Columnar cells to cuboidal cells
    4. Ciliated columnar cells to ciliated cuboidal cells
    5. Columnar cells to pseudostratified columnar cells
    1. Can lead to chronic bronchitis
    2. Commonly referred to as croup
    3. Often caused by parainfluenza virus
    4. Characteristic "steeple sign" on xray
    5. Effects the proximal conducting portion of the lung
    1. K. pneumoniae
    2. S. aureus
    3. P. aeruginosa
    4. S. pneumoniae
    5. Parainfluenza virus
    1. At least 3 months of productive cough for at least 2 consecutive years
    2. At least 6 months of productive cough for at least 2 years
    3. At least 3 months of productive cough for at least 3 years
    4. At least 6 months of productive cough for 3 years
    5. At least 3 months of productive cough for 5 years
    1. Respiratory syncytial virus
    2. K. pneumoniae
    3. S. aureus
    4. Parainfluenza virus
    5. P. aeruginosa
    1. Exposure to allergens
    2. Exposure to the cold
    3. Exercise
    4. Aspirin
    5. Smoking
    1. Increased AP diameter of the chest
    2. Productive cough
    3. Increased Reid index
    4. Increase risk of developing bacterial pneumonia
    5. Sensitivity to allergens
    1. An area in the pulmonary tree that does not participate in gas exchange
    2. A pathologic area of the lung where gas exchange does not occur
    3. Areas of air trapping in the pulmonary tree
    4. Areas of ischemic necrosis that can no longer participate in gas exchange
    5. Areas of thickened, fibrotic membranes that can no longer participate in gas exchange
    1. H. influenzae
    2. Respiratory syncytial virus
    3. M. pneumoniae
    4. L. pneumophila
    5. C. pneumoniae
    1. M. pneumoniae
    2. L. pneumophila
    3. C. pneumoniae
    4. Respiratory syncytial virus
    5. S. aureus
    1. Ground glass opacity
    2. Coin lesion
    3. Lobar infiltrates
    4. Air-fluid level
    5. Hilar lymphadenopathy
    1. Requires a previous diagnosis of emphysema
    2. Seen peripherally on chest xray
    3. Most common lung cancer
    4. Commonly seen in non-smokers
    5. Occurs in the respiratory portion of the pulmonary tree
    1. Protein rich
    2. A specific gravity less than 1.012
    3. Presence of RBCs
    4. Decreased interstitial fluid volume
    5. Presence of WBCs
    1. Hypercarbia
    2. Tachypnea
    3. Pulmonary edema
    4. Hypoxia
    5. Metabolic compensation
    1. 100mmHg
    2. 60mmHg
    3. 120mmHg
    4. 45mmHg
    5. 80mmHg
    1. CO2
    2. O2
    3. Blood pressure
    4. Ventilation
    5. H+
    1. Readily crosses the blood brain barrier
    2. Pressure changes at different altitudes
    3. Low environmental pressure means higher internal pressures
    4. Does not bind to RBCs
    5. Moves freely between arterial and venous blood
    1. Alveoli
    2. Chemoreceptors
    3. Chest wall
    4. Upper airway
    5. Brainstem
    1. Sleep
    2. Left sided heart failure
    3. Metabolic disturbances
    4. Decreased drive to breath from CNS
    5. Anemia
    1. COPD
    2. Infection
    3. PE
    4. Metabolic disturbance
    5. Acute asthma attack
    1. Platypnea
    2. Orthopnea
    3. Dyspnea on exertion
    4. Dyspnea at rest
    5. Obstructive dyspnea

    Author of lecture Pulmonary Pathology: Introduction, Bronchial Anatomy & Dyspnea

     Carlo Raj, MD

    Carlo Raj, MD


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