Lectures

Anterior and Medial Thigh

by James Pickering, PhD
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    In this lecture, we’re going to look at the anterior and medial thigh. So we’re going to look at the anterior muscles within the thigh quadriceps, look at sartorius, iliopsoas, and pectineus. We’ll look at their function and their innervation. We’ll then look at the medial thigh muscles, the adductor muscles and gracilis. We’ll look at their function and innervation. We’ll then look at the pes anserinus, an important collection of tendons on the medial aspect of the tibia. And then we’ll look at the femoral triangle, its boundaries, and contents. And we’ll look at the adductor canal, again, its boundaries and contents. Here, we can see the main musculature on the anterior thigh. We can see that these muscles, rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus intermedius, and vastus lateralis, collectively known as the quadriceps. Femoris muscle lie on the anterior aspects or anterior to the femur in this right lower limb. We can see they pass down towards the tibia via this patellar ligament. So if we have a look at the origins and the insertions, then the rectus femoris is coming from the anterior inferior iliac spine. Make sure you remember those bony landmarks we pointed out. Vastus lateralis is coming from the greater trochanter and the lateral lip of the linea aspera. Vastus intermedius is coming from the anterior aspect of the shaft of the femur, whereas, vastus medialis is coming from the intertrochanteric line and the medial lip of the linea aspera. All of these muscles travel down and converge on the tibial tuberosity initially via the common quadriceps and then the patellar ligament with the patellar bone actually within the patellar ligament sitting anterior to the distal part of the femur. All of these muscles are supplied by the femoral nerve, the femoral nerve being the...

    About the Lecture

    The lecture Anterior and Medial Thigh by James Pickering, PhD is from the course Lower Limb Anatomy. It contains the following chapters:

    • Anterior and Medial Thigh
    • Anterior thigh muscles
    • Anterior compartment of thigh
    • Medial thigh muscles
    • Pes anserinus
    • Femoral triangle
    • Adductor Canal

    Included Quiz Questions

    1. Adductor longus
    2. Adductor magnus
    3. Sartorius
    4. Iliopsoas
    1. Rectus femoris
    2. Vastus lateralis
    3. Vastus medialis
    4. Vastus intermedias
    1. Rectus femoris
    2. Vastus lateralis
    3. Vastus medialis
    4. Vastus intermedius
    1. Superolateral
    2. Superomedial
    3. Inferomedial
    4. Inferolateral
    1. Psoas major
    2. Iliacus
    3. Pectineus
    4. Sartorius
    1. Anterior inferior iliac spine
    2. Anterior superior iliac spine
    3. Posterior superior iliac spine
    4. Posterior inferior iliac spine
    1. Saphenous nerve
    2. Posterior cutaneous nerve of the thigh
    3. Small saphenous vein
    4. Tibial nerve
    1. Adductor magnus
    2. Adductor longus
    3. Adductor brevis
    4. Adductor hallucis

    Author of lecture Anterior and Medial Thigh

     James Pickering, PhD

    James Pickering, PhD


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