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Abnormalities of the Development of the Gut – Stomach, Midgut and Hindgut Development

by John McLachlan, PhD
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    00:01 One of the problems that can develop during a development of the gut is a condition known as pyloric stenosis. The pyloric muscle is a strong muscle which closes the exit to the stomach. And if this muscle is overdeveloped, then a variety of consequences can arise.

    00:16 When the baby feeds, the stomach will distend and it reaches a certain point where the distention will turn into a strong contraction and projectile vomiting can take place. This is spectacular in a baby, and they can project and they’ll cover several metres. This is as opposed to milk dribbling from the mouth as one may find in the case of tracheoesophageal fistula with esophageal atresia which we covered in the lecture in lung development. This condition is more common in males than in females, and will generally occur a few weeks after birth.

    00:54 A mass can be felt in the abdomen, about the size of an olive, and this condition is relatively straightforward to deal with surgically. However, if left untreated, it could in fact prove fatal.

    01:08 Another set of complications can arise at the hind end of the gut. If the anal canal fails to open to the outside, there’ll be a blind ending to the gut, and the baby will be unable to pass bowel movements after birth. This condition may remain as a blind ending, but another series of possibilities are that they can form an exit through another part of the body. The blind endings are illustrated in diagrams A and B. But if we’re to look at diagrams C and D, we can see in there that in the first one, in C, then the gut is exiting in an abnormal position closer to the perineum. And in D, it’s exiting through the vagina.

    01:51 This would mean that the baby will be producing bowel movements at the vagina instead of in the normal anal situation. In image E, then the bowel is connected by a fistula to the urethra, and therefore, the bowel movements will emerge from the end of the penis in this male child.

    02:12 Conversely, the fistula may be present in the bladder. Again, this may be corrected surgically.

    02:18 So, in this lecture, we’ve looked at the developments of the stomach, the midgut and the midgut loop, the hindgut, and some abnormalities of these structures.


    About the Lecture

    The lecture Abnormalities of the Development of the Gut – Stomach, Midgut and Hindgut Development by John McLachlan, PhD is from the course System-Specific Embryology with John McLachlan.


    Author of lecture Abnormalities of the Development of the Gut – Stomach, Midgut and Hindgut Development

     John McLachlan, PhD

    John McLachlan, PhD


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